A new episode of the Madison presidency series is now available!
Jan. 9, 2022

3.40 – Jefferson Post-Presidency

3.40 – Jefferson Post-Presidency

Year(s) Discussed: 1809-1826 After leaving the presidency, Thomas Jefferson found himself kept quite busy with both public business and personal matters. While striving to be a doting grandfather and fretting over his family’s life struggles, the former president worked in vain to escape the vicious cycle of debt in which he had become trapped. Meanwhile, he used his retirement to take on the task of improving public education in Virginia which inevitably landed him in the middle of political struggles once more.


Special thanks to Kenny Ryan from the [Abridged] Presidential Histories podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode and to Alex Van Rose for his audio editing work!

The transcript for this episode can be found here.

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Featured Image: “Thomas Jefferson” by Thomas Sully [c. 1821], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band