A new episode of the Madison presidency series is now available!
Nov. 15, 2020

3.24 – Truth and Consequences

3.24 – Truth and Consequences

Year(s) Discussed: 1803-1805

With a presidential election looming, the Jefferson administration had to consider how to wrap up the first term and transition to the second. For some, that meant moving into new positions. For others, retirement was in their future. As the campaign worked to rally the public, the decisions of 1804 made at home and abroad would have far-reaching consequences.


Featured Images: “Thomas Jefferson” by Rembrandt Peale [c. 1800], courtesy of Wikipedia and “George Clinton” by Ezra Ames [c. 1814], courtesy of Wikipedia


Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band

 

Special thanks to Theshira Pather of the Legendary Africa podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode!

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Featured Images: “Major General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney” by James Earl [c. 1795-1796], courtesy of Wikipedia, and “Rufus King” by Charles Willson Peale [c. 1818], courtesy of Wikipedia