A new episode of the Madison presidency series is now available!
Feb. 8, 2020

3.12 – And the Beat Goes On

3.12 – And the Beat Goes On

Year(s) Discussed: 1801-1803

As a new state joined the Union, state and federal leaders in the US worked to redefine the nation’s governmental institutions and its approach to foreign affairs. Jefferson put some plans into motion to stretch American influence through an expedition across western North America. Meanwhile, as Democratic-Republicans sought to wrest control of the judiciary from Federalists, the Supreme Court delivered a pivotal ruling.


Featured Image: “Charles Lee” by Cephas Giovanni Thompson [c. 19th century], courtesy of Wikipedia


Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band

 

Special thanks to Robert Van Ness of the Virginia History Podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode!

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Featured Image: “Levi Lincoln” by James Sullivan Lincoln [c. 1865], courtesy of United States Department of Justice