A new episode of the Madison presidency series is now available!
Sept. 15, 2019

3.03 – The Revolution of 1800

3.03 – The Revolution of 1800

Year(s) Discussed: 1800-1801

As Jefferson assumed office and Democratic-Republicans took control of the federal government in March 1801, new leaders emerged while others exited the stage or moved to the periphery. The new administration would get its start still dealing with the aftermath of the recent contentious election, and the new President had to weigh, with his words and his first decisions, how to balance his obligations to his party and the best interests of the nation.


Special thanks to Jacob Collier of the Podcast on Germany for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • Dangerfield, George. Chancellor Robert R. Livingston of New York, 1746-1813. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co, 1960.
  • “Dearborn, Henry, (1751-1829).” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=D000178. [Last Accessed: 12 Aug 2019]
  • “The 4th Presidential Inauguration: Thomas Jefferson, March 04, 1801.” Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies. https://www.inaugural.senate.gov/about/past-inaugural-ceremonies/4th-inaugural-ceremonies/index.html. [Last Accessed: 11 Aug 2019]
  • Hall, Kermit L, etc, eds. The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Robert R. Livingston, 14 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0205. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, pp. 302–304.] [Last Accessed: 14 Aug 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To James Madison, 1 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0381. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, p. 537.] [Last Accessed: 12 Aug 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Henry Dearborn, 18 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0009. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, p. 13.] [Last Accessed: 12 Aug 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To James Madison, 18 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0012. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, pp. 16–17.] [Last Accessed: 12 Aug 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Samuel Dexter, 20 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0021. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, p. 24.] [Last Accessed: 14 Aug 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Benjamin Stoddert, 21 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0034. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, p. 35.] [Last Accessed: 14 Aug 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Inaugural Address [4 Mar 1801].” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/201948. [Last Accessed: 11 Aug 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “First Inaugural Address.” The Portable Thomas Jefferson. Merrill D Peterson, ed. New York: Penguin Books, 1977 [1975]. p. 290-295.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Inaugural Address, March 4, reading copy, in Jefferson’s hand. March 4, 1801.” Manuscript/Mixed Material. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/pin0405/. [Last Accessed: 11 Aug 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Levi Lincoln, 5 March 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0141. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, pp. 181–182.] [Last Accessed: 12 Aug 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Notes on a Cabinet Meeting, 8 March 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0177. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, pp. 219–220.] [Last Accessed: 14 Aug 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Joseph Priestley, 21 March 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0336.  [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, pp. 393–395.] [Last Accessed: 11 July 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Spencer Roane, 6 September 1819,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/98-01-02-0734. [Last Accessed: 10 August 2019]
  • Ketcham, Ralph. James Madison: A Biography. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1994 [1971].
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2019. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • “Lincoln, Levi, (1749-1820).” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=L000316. [Last Accessed: 12 Aug 2019]
  • Linden, Frank van der. The Turning Point: Jefferson’s Battle for the Presidency. Washington, DC: Robert B Luce Inc, 1962.
  • Lomask, Milton. Aaron Burr: The Years from Princeton to Vice President 1756-1805. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1979.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson and the Ordeal of Liberty: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Three. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1962.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President First Term, 1801-1805: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Four. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1970.
  • McGuiness, Colleen, ed. American Leaders 1789-1994: A Biographical Summary. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly, 1994.
  • “SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1801.” Senate Journal. Library of Congress. https://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:@field(DOCID+@lit(sj003201)). [Last Accessed: 11 Aug 2019]
  • Seale, William. The President’s House: A History, Volume One. Washington, DC: White House Historical Association, 1986.
  • Sharp, James Roger. The Deadlocked Election of 1800: Jefferson, Burr, and the Union in the Balance. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2010.
  • Smith, Jean Edward. John Marshall: Definer of a Nation. New York: Henry Holt & Co, 1996.
  • Stewart, David O. American Emperor: Aaron Burr’s Challenge to Jefferson’s America. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011.
  • Stoddert, Benjamin. “To Thomas Jefferson, 18 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0015. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, pp. 18–19.] [Last Accessed: 14 Aug 2019]
  • “THURSDAY,March 5, 1801.” Senate Executive Journal. Library of Congress. http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?hlaw:3:./temp/~ammem_J3a7:: [Last Accessed: 11 Aug 2019]
  • White, Leonard D. The Jeffersonians: A Study in Administrative History 1801-1829. New York: The Macmillan Co, 1956 [1951].


Featured Image: “Election Day in Philadelphia” by John Lewis Krimmel [c. 1815], courtesy of Wikipedia